Blog

Primary Care Treatment of Anxiety is Adequate, but Problems Persist

Brown University researchers discovered seven in ten primary care patients with anxiety disorders receive potentially adequate medication or psychotherapy. The not-so-positive finding was that the successful anxiety reduction would often take years to accomplish and that it was considerably less likely for minorities. By year five of follow-up, 69 percent had received either or both appropriate medication (60 percent) or psychosocial treatment, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy (36 percent). “The good news here was that eventually, most patients got some good treatment,” said study lead author Risa Weisberg, Ph.D. “The bad news is that pharmacotherapy wasn’t sustained for long periods of time, and that cognitive-behavioral therapy was rarely received,” she added.

Read the entire article here: Primary Care Treatment of Anxiety is Adequate, but Problems Persist